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Item(s) found: 213
Chief Privacy Officer for Education Act letter to NYT editor
Date CapturedTuesday October 15 2013, 9:40 AM
New York State Student Information Repository System (SIRS) Manual
Date CapturedWednesday December 22 2010, 8:44 PM
New York State Student t Information Repository System (SIRS) Manual; Reporting Data for the 2010–11 School Year (SEE APPENDIX 19)
NEW YORK STATE’S Essential Elements: Schools-to-Watch Recognition Program for 2011-12
Date CapturedTuesday December 21 2010, 12:31 AM
New York State’s Essential Elements: Schools-to-Watch (EE: STW) recognition program seeks to identify and recognize diverse, high-performing model middle-level schools that demonstrate what all schools with middle-level grades should be and are capable of achieving.
27 Schools Named As “Persistently Dangerous” Under NCLB
Date CapturedWednesday August 22 2007, 7:58 AM
All schools designated as “persistently dangerous” must provide school choice to students where transfer options exist. Each school also receives a $100,000 grant to help improve school safety. School districts must also submit an Incident Reduction Plan for each school to show the specific steps that the district will take to reduce the number of violent incidents and improve safety at the school. Staff from the New York State Center for School Safety and Regional School Support Centers also provide help to each school to improve safety.
State to select a new historian
Date CapturedMonday August 20 2007, 9:30 AM
Times Union reports, "The new hire will chair the 12-member history department at the State Museum and help market its assets. The state historian will also oversee curatorial services, including managing $20 million in planned upgrades to the State Museum's exhibits, according to John P. Hart, director of the research and collections division at the State Museum. The job will include a key role in planning and construction of a $100 million storage facility to house the State Museum's collections."
New York State ranks 44th in graduation rate
Date CapturedThursday August 02 2007, 8:15 AM
Times Union reports, "'We're a lot more honest, I think, than others,' said Education Department spokesman Tom Dunn. But he conceded that 'expectations must be much higher.' Yet the report found that New York, like many states, actually exaggerates its graduation rate in some instances. The report says the state told the U.S. Department of Education that 77 percent of its high school freshmen graduated in four years. But by what the report says is a more accurate measure, the figure was 12 points lower."
State is on guard to keep schools safe
Date CapturedWednesday August 01 2007, 8:52 AM
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle guest essayist Alan Ray, director of communications and policy development, New York State Education Department opines, "During the past year, we have: *Provided help to Rochester's and other schools to create safer, more supportive learning environments and prevent bullying. *Held focus groups with parents, students, teachers and administrators to get more ideas on how to make schools safer. *Given uniform training to school personnel statewide on accurate reporting. *Made site visits to nearly 100 schools statewide to determine the accuracy of their data. *Provided detailed guidelines on the Internet so school officials can refer to them easily as needed. We are constantly adding to a question-and-answer document on the Web site as people seek additional guidance. *Developed a fully automated incident reporting system so schools can submit data electronically. This system has controls to help schools check the accuracy of their data and omit inadvertent errors."
Upcoming Webcasts of NYSED Board Meetings
Date CapturedWednesday July 25 2007, 9:40 AM
Board of Regents Meetings -- July 25, 2007 - Board of Regents Meeting (10:30 AM - 11:30 AM and 6:15 PM - 6:45 PM): Live Webcast: (Windows Media Player) (Real Player) | Archived Webcast
Buffalo schools get $6.8 million
Date CapturedTuesday July 24 2007, 10:52 AM
Buffalo News reports, "Buffalo Public School officials have announced the district has secured $6.8 million in grant funds from three sources in the state Education Department."
Newburgh school district unsettled by Supreme Court decision
Date CapturedThursday July 19 2007, 8:59 AM
Times Herald-Record reports, ""The state Department of Education is reviewing the impact of the decision. The issue will come before the state Board of Regents Wednesday, Robert Bennett, chancellor of the Regents, said yesterday. Among the mid-Hudson's 34 school districts, only four have non-white populations exceeding 40 percent: Newburgh (66 percent), Middletown (65 percent), Fallsburg (43 percent) and Monticello (44 percent), according to the most recent state Report Card data. Newburgh is the only one under a desegregation order. It went into effect in 1975."
Area schools get funds for disabled
Date CapturedThursday June 28 2007, 8:28 AM
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle reports, "The grants will fund programs to assist disabled students in vocational opportunities helping them move into college, job training opportunities, employment and internships."
Regents: Schools must have contracts of accountability
Date CapturedTuesday June 26 2007, 8:48 AM
Poughkeepsie Journal reports, "With the new school year only a few months away, the state Education Department and school officials are racing to get effective accountability contracts in place for 56 school districts receiving large state-aid hikes. The school systems have to develop 'Contracts for Excellence' because they have a minimum of one underperforming school and are getting funding increases of at least $15 million or 10 percent more than last year. Gov. Eliot Spitzer proposed the measure, which was included in the Legislature's budget as part of a $7 billion boost in state school aid over four years."
Test fraud lands Uniondale schools on probation
Date CapturedFriday June 15 2007, 7:26 PM
Newsday John Hildebrand reports, "In what appears to be the worst case of test fraud in recent state history, the State Education Department has invalidated all test results in the Uniondale district for last year's math assessments in grades three to eight, together with all math Regents exams at the district's high school. All eight of the district's schools have been placed on academic probation as a result of the state's findings, and could see their state scholastic ratings slip next year if test scores don't improve. However, none of the 5,100 Uniondale students who took those tests have been implicated in the case, and no individual exam scores will be affected."
STATE VS. NAEP COMPARISONS RELEASED TODAY
Date CapturedFriday June 08 2007, 10:24 AM
The comparison shows that New York ranks as follows: * 9th among 32 states in grade 4 reading (The state test in grade 4 and 8 is actually a test of reading and writing.) * 3rd among 34 states in grade 8 reading * 29th among 33 states in grade 4 math * 13th among 36 states in grade 8 math.
News & Notes
Date CapturedFriday June 01 2007, 7:59 AM
Johanna Duncan-Poitier, Senior Deputy Commissioner of Education - P-16
A moment to evaluate Mills
Date CapturedThursday May 24 2007, 8:06 AM
Newsday opines, "Mills should keep his job - for now. But the state must do its job, in Roosevelt and beyond. And that includes starting to think about new leadership in Albany."
Pol calls for Mills to step down
Date CapturedWednesday May 23 2007, 9:40 AM
Newsday John Hildebrand reports, "A key state senator from Long Island is calling for the resignation of State Education Commissioner Richard Mills, saying the state's top schools executive bears direct responsibility for a multimillion-dollar budget deficit in Roosevelt."
MIDDLE SCHOOL PERFORMANCE IMPROVES ON 2007 GRADE 3-8 ENGLISH TESTS
Date CapturedWednesday May 23 2007, 8:56 AM
Achievement in grade 3-8 English has improved overall this year, according to results from newly released State tests. The improvement is notable in middle school. Grades 6-8 improved. Grade 6 increased by 2.8 percent, grade 7 improved by 1.4 percent, and grade 8 increased by 7.7 percent. Fewer students also are showing serious academic problems in all grades except grade 3. The number of English Language Learners taking this year’s tests more than doubled from 2006. This increase was caused by new federal rules under NCLB in which all ELL students who have been in the country for at least one year are now required to take the tests. Nevertheless, the performance of ELL students dipped only modestly in each grade, a better result than many predicted. The increase in the number of students tested was especially large in elementary school; scores declined overall in grades 3 and 4. The change in rules also affected the overall performance of Hispanic and Asian students. Results for students with disabilities improved overall. The decline in the percentage of students who showed serious academic problems was especially large.
Transition Leader Is Named for Ailing Roosevelt Schools
Date CapturedTuesday May 22 2007, 9:02 AM
NY Times WINNIE HU reports, "State education officials have asked a veteran school administrator who is a former president of the New York State Council of School Superintendents to oversee a transition period for the troubled Roosevelt Union Free School District on Long Island. The administrator, William Brosnan, will lead transition efforts until a new superintendent is appointed, Richard P. Mills, the state education commissioner, said yesterday."
Poor grade for timing?
Date CapturedSunday May 20 2007, 3:25 PM
Newsday John Hildebrand reports, "Officials representing the state's school superintendents are relieved by the timing. A group representative, Robert Lowry, was outspoken earlier this month, declaring that it would be wrong to publish report cards immediately before elections - especially since this wouldn't allow schools time to correct any mistakes."
New York State School and District Report Cards for School Year 2005-2006
Date CapturedFriday May 18 2007, 8:45 AM
These Report Cards are produced to inform the people of New York State about the performance of public schools and districts. We hope that these reports are used in constructive conversations which lead to improved education for all children in the State. Select a county to access school and district reports:
Error clouds vote on school budget
Date CapturedFriday May 18 2007, 8:40 AM
Times Union reports, "A state Education Department error left voters thinking they could save $1.37 million by rejecting Albany's school budget this week.."
New York Statewide Annual School District Budget Voting Results
Date CapturedThursday May 17 2007, 8:33 AM
(Listed by BOCES Region)
The Chapter 655 Report
Date CapturedMonday May 14 2007, 10:31 PM
Report to the Governor and the Legislature on the Educational Status of the State's Schools
Section 104.1(i) of Commissioner’s Regulations
Date CapturedMonday May 14 2007, 9:18 PM
EXCERPT: (vi) a description of the incentives to be employed to encourage pupil attendance and any disciplinary sanctions to be used to discourage unexcused pupil absences, tardiness and early departures; (vii) a description of the notice to be provided to the parent(s) of or person(s) in parental relation to pupils who are absent, tardy or depart early without proper excuse. (viii) a description of the process to develop specific intervention strategies to be employed by teachers and other school employees to address identified patterns of unexcused pupil absence, tardiness or early departure; (ix) identification of the person(s) designated in each school building who will be responsible for reviewing pupil attendance records and initiating appropriate action to address unexcused pupil absence, tardiness and early departure consistent with the comprehensive attendance policy. (3) The board of education, board of cooperative educational services, charter school board, county vocational education and extension board and governing body of a nonpublic school shall annually review the building level pupil attendance records and if such records show a decline in pupil attendance the board or governing body shall revise the comprehensive pupil attendance policy and make any revisions to the plan deemed necessary to improve pupil attendance. (4) Each board of education, board of cooperative educational services, charter school board, county vocational education and extension board, and nonpublic school shall promote necessary community awareness of its comprehensive attendance policy by: (i) providing a plain language summary of the policy to the parents or persons in parental relation to students at the beginning of each school year and taking such other steps deemed necessary to promote the understanding of such policy by students and their parents or persons in parental relation; (ii) providing each teacher with a copy of the policy and any amendments thereto as soon as practicable following initial adoption or amendment of the policy, and providing new teachers with a copy of the policy upon their employment; and (iii) making copies of the policy available to any other member of the community upon request.
Section 3211 - Title IV, Article 65, Part I -- Records of attendance upon instruction
Date CapturedMonday May 14 2007, 9:00 PM
Sec. 3211. Records of attendance upon instruction. 1. Who shall keep such record. The teacher of every minor required by the provisions of part one of this article to attend upon instruction, or any other school district employee as may be designated by the commissioner of education under section three thousand twenty-four of this chapter, shall keep an accurate record of the attendance and absence of such minor. Such record shall be in such form as may be prescribed by the commissioner of education. 2. Certificates of attendance to be presumptive evidence. A duly certified transcript of the record of attendance and absence of a child which has been kept, as provided in this section, shall be accepted as presumptive evidence of the attendance of such child in any proceeding brought under the provisions of part one of this article. 3. Inspection of records of attendance. An attendance officer, or any other duly authorized representative of the school authorities, may at any time during school hours, demand the production of the records of attendance of minors required to be kept by the provisions of part one of this article, and may inspect or copy the same and make all proper inquiries of a teacher or principal concerning the records and the attendance of such minors. 4. Duties of principal or person in charge of the instruction of a minor. The principal of a school, or other person in charge of the instruction upon which a minor attends, as provided by part one of this article, shall cause the record of his attendance to be kept and produced and all appropriate inquiries in relation thereto answered as hereinbefore required. He shall give prompt notification in writing to the school authorities of the city or district of the discharge or transfer of any such minor from attendance upon instruction, stating the date of the discharge, its cause, the name of the minor, his date of birth, his place of residence prior to and following discharge, if such place of residence be known, and the name of the person in parental relation to the minor.
104.l Pupil attendance recordkeeping
Date CapturedMonday May 14 2007, 10:43 AM
EXCERPT (FULL TEXT AT LINK) (ix) identification of the person(s) designated in each school building who will be responsible for reviewing pupil attendance records and initiating appropriate action to address unexcused pupil absence, tardiness and early departure consistent with the comprehensive attendance policy. (3) The board of education, board of cooperative educational services, charter school board, county vocational education and extension board and governing body of a nonpublic school shall annually review the building level pupil attendance records and if such records show a decline in pupil attendance the board or governing body shall revise the comprehensive pupil attendance policy and make any revisions to the plan deemed necessary to improve pupil attendance. (4) Each board of education, board of cooperative educational services, charter school board, county vocational education and extension board, and nonpublic school shall promote necessary community awareness of its comprehensive attendance policy by: (i) providing a plain language summary of the policy to the parents or persons in parental relation to students at the beginning of each school year and taking such other steps deemed necessary to promote the understanding of such policy by students and their parents or persons in parental relation; (ii) providing each teacher with a copy of the policy and any amendments thereto as soon as practicable following initial adoption or amendment of the policy, and providing new teachers with a copy of the policy upon their employment; and (iii) making copies of the policy available to any other member of the community upon request.
Sec. 3212-a. Records of telephone numbers
Date CapturedMonday May 14 2007, 10:26 AM
1. Each school shall maintain a record of the telephone number of each pupil enrolled in the school and each person in parental relation to such pupil including the residential and business telephone numbers of persons in parental relation to pupils unless such person or pupil chooses not to supply such numbers. The record of such telephone numbers shall, except as otherwise provided by law, be accessible solely for emergency purposes. 2. The provisions of this section shall not be applicable in any school district in which the board of education has adopted a resolution providing that the record otherwise required hereby shall not be maintained.
Key Laws and Regulations Regarding Attendance
Date CapturedMonday May 14 2007, 10:20 AM
ATTENDANCE INCENTIVES
Date CapturedMonday May 14 2007, 10:16 AM
Attendance policy and programming, coupled with school climate and increased academic performance, offers a unique opportunity to engage the entire school community – parents, staff, students, and community members – in a process that will build upon the strengths of all concerned. Maintenance of high attendance rates depends upon incentives that range from climate/culture to district-wide and building programs to recognition for accomplishments to individual sanctions (disincentives). Each category has distinct functions. Although districts will differ in the incentives employed depending upon the philosophies and needs of family and community, programs are quite likely to span the entire spectrum. The specific strategies developed and implemented by a district will reflect the diversity and creativity that exists within schools and their communities.
More schools on LI making the grade
Date CapturedSaturday May 12 2007, 9:26 AM
Newsday John Hildebrand reports, "Private analysts are skeptical. They note that the state Education Department for the first time this year has decided not to release "school report cards" until budget votes are completed. Voters need those report cards to judge schools' performance, analysts say, because the reports cover test results for a full range of subjects, not just the highlights. And some voice concern that the state would release the names of the highest-scoring schools so close to election time. "So we're having a cheerleader session before the budget vote," said B. Jason Brooks, a senior research associate at the Foundation for Education Reform and Accountability, an Albany-area think tank. 'Yet parents and residents don't have straightforward data.'"
Schools vary on drug-use penalties -- With no statewide protocol, area districts differ on severity
Date CapturedFriday May 11 2007, 7:59 AM
The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle reports, "The state Department of Education, state School Boards Association and the Monroe County School Boards Association do not offer opinions on how long to suspend young people who abuse alcohol and drugs on campus. 'We leave it totally to local discretion,' said Jonathan Burman, spokesman for the state Education Department, which doesn't keep data on different schools' policies."
News & Notes
Date CapturedWednesday May 09 2007, 10:26 PM
Johanna Duncan-Poitier, Senior Deputy Commissioner of Education - P-16, May 8, 2007.
NYS Office of Mental Health and Education Department Together Promoting Healthy Child Development
Date CapturedWednesday May 09 2007, 10:02 AM
Michael F. Hogan, Ph.D., Commissioner of the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) and Richard P. Mills, Commissioner of the New York State Education Department (SED), today co-hosted a gathering of parents, school teachers and administrators, pediatricians, mental health providers and advocates, to celebrate National Children's Mental Health Awareness day. Held in the Cultural Education Center's Huxley Theater, the event celebrated children's emotional wellbeing and healthy development, and focused on the shared goals and new directions that OMH and SED are undertaking for the children of New York State.
A check mark under 'tardy' for the state
Date CapturedTuesday May 08 2007, 9:35 AM
Times Union reports, "Typically, the state Education Department releases the data to the media in the form of lengthy computer files. Newspapers and other outlets then sift through the data and present it in a user-friendly form that allows for school-to-school and district-to-district comparisons. But as of Monday, the data hadn't been released to the media. Education Department officials did not say why, but did say it could be coming as soon as this week."
State probes test fraud in Uniondale schools
Date CapturedSunday April 29 2007, 9:31 AM
Newsday John Hildebrand reports, "The state is investigating potentially large-scale test fraud in the Uniondale school district, including alleged tampering with Regents exams required for graduation, state and local officials said. Investigators from the state attorney general's office questioned both school administrators and teachers last week, according to Uniondale officials who expressed anguish about the situation. The district plans to send out letters Monday to parents of the district's 6,400 students, acknowledging the state probe. Findings could be announced this week. Education Department officials said if any district staffers are implicated, students' scores on past tests would not be affected -- unless students themselves also are found culpable."
A test for the Regents
Date CapturedSunday April 29 2007, 9:26 AM
Newsday opines, "Meanwhile, the problems of poverty force the schools to divert more money from the classroom - for everything from security to special education - than any other district. And political tweaking of state formulas on behalf of the wealthy means Roosevelt still won't get a fair share of school aid. It's show time Even before the next school year, Mills and the Regents must take these steps. They must find new leaders who will in turn inspire teachers, parents and students. And in so doing, they can create a national model of success for other struggling schools - especially those that fall through the cracks in the suburbs. It's an effort that will take the cooperation of everyone from state educators and lawmakers to local governments that aren't normally involved in education. Everyone from private philanthropists to community groups and parents. It's time to give the students of Roosevelt and their parents the fair shake that was denied the thousands who came before them. This is a test not just of Albany's competency but of its character."
Information & Reporting Services
Date CapturedThursday April 26 2007, 9:15 AM
Graduation Data for New York Public Schools -- includes text and slides.
NEW GRADUATION RESULTS RELEASED FOR HIGH SCHOOLS STATEWIDE
Date CapturedThursday April 26 2007, 9:07 AM
Statewide high school graduation results released today show that: Statewide, 72 percent of the students who started 9th grade in 2001 had graduated after 5 years, by June 30, 2006. Statewide, 67 percent of the students who started 9th grade in 2002 had graduated after 4 years. This is an increase of one percentage point from the 4-year graduation rate of students who started 9th grade in 2001. The 4-year graduation rate of African-American students increased from 44 to 47 percent between 2004 and 2006, although it remains far too low and far below the rate of white students. The 4-year graduation rate of Hispanic students increased from 41 to 45 percent between 2004 and 2006, although it also remains far too low. New York City has increased its 4-year graduation rate from 44 percent in 2004 to 50 percent in 2006.
COMMISSIONER MILLS MEETS WITH NEW YORK CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION; DISCUSSES “NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND” REAUTHORIZATION
Date CapturedTuesday April 24 2007, 9:56 PM
State Education Commissioner Richard Mills met with members of New York’s Congressional delegation in Washington D.C. Wednesday to urge key changes in the upcoming renewal of the No Child Left Behind Act.
State school boss Richard Mills won't quit
Date CapturedTuesday April 24 2007, 9:44 AM
Newsday reports, "Mills and his department received multiple warnings over the past three years that Roosevelt's finances were in weak shape, though the exact size of the deficit was not revealed until last month. "What's going on in Roosevelt is a black mark on the Regents, and we need to fix it," said Merryl Tisch of Manhattan, recently elected the board's vice chairman. "And we need to hold the commissioner responsible." The board is expected to review Roosevelt developments in May, though it is not scheduled to formally review Mills' job performance until July."
New & Notes
Date CapturedMonday April 23 2007, 10:20 AM
From the desk of Johanna Duncan-Poitier, Senior Deputy Commissioner of Education - P-16, April 20, 2007.
State comptroller questions Roosevelt finances anew
Date CapturedSaturday April 21 2007, 9:25 AM
Newsday reports, "'Serious concerns were identified that what was being proposed was not sufficient to meet the challenges of the deficit ... ' said state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. 'They didn't follow their own spending plans in previous years.' In addition, some of the methods the district proposed for closing the budget gap were found to be financially unsound or illegal, the comptroller's office said. For example, the district said it was considering using the tax levy to pay down the deficit when state law says that such revenue can only be used for operating expenses."
School Official Visits District Run by State
Date CapturedFriday April 13 2007, 8:35 AM
NY Times reports, "Responding to a recent state audit that projected a $12.3 million budget deficit in the chronically troubled Roosevelt school district, Richard P. Mills, the state education commissioner, acknowledged to an audience of parents and teachers on Thursday night that he had failed to notice that the district had been spending millions it did not have."
P-16 Implementation and Evaluation of the Regents Teaching Policy: Second Annual Report on Teacher Supply and Demand
Date CapturedThursday April 05 2007, 10:38 AM
What does the data on teacher supply and demand reveal about teacher shortages? What strategies should be used to eliminate those shortages and ensure that all students have certified and highly qualified teachers?
Office of Educational Management Services New York State Education Department
Date CapturedThursday April 05 2007, 10:32 AM
POLICY FOR NYSED’s Response To A Pupil Transportation Fatality
LATEST INFORMATION ON THE NEW YORK 2007-2008 STATE BUDGET
Date CapturedThursday April 05 2007, 10:28 AM
New & Notes
LATEST INFORMATION ON THE 2007-2008 NY STATE EDUCATION BUDGET
Date CapturedWednesday April 04 2007, 9:16 AM
2007-08 State Aid Projections; Preliminary Estimates of 2006-07 and 2007-08 State Aids; Payable Under Section 3609 and Other Aids.
P-16 Education: A Plan for Action
Date CapturedWednesday April 04 2007, 9:10 AM
Improve high school attendance and graduation rates by setting performance targets, promoting promising practices that remove barriers to graduation, and holding schools accountable for dramatic improvements. Problem: Since higher standards were adopted in 1996, the number of high school graduates each year has increased. However, only 64% of students who entered 9th grade in 2001 graduated in four years; 18% were still enrolled and 11% had dropped out. Rates for Black and Hispanic students were below 45%. Data show that graduation rates are closely tied to attendance rates. As attendance declines below 95%, graduation rates decline significantly. And both attendance and graduation rates decline with poverty. New York’s current graduation rate standard is only 55%, one of the lowest in the nation. Schools need to focus on the least served students, such as Black males, English Language Learners, and students with disabilities. Actions: ¦ Set a State graduation rate standard, publish four- and five-year graduation rates by school, and specify a schedule of improvement targets for schools to close the gap between their graduation rate and State standard. Set targets now for the students who entered 9th grade in 2004 and will graduate in 2008. This action is especially important to ensure that more schools intervene to help the most underserved students, such as Black males, English Language Learners, and students with disabilities Research and benchmark other states for effective, innovative strategies that improve high school graduation and attendance rates. Include strategies that begin in middle school and focus on the transition from middle to high school. Emphasize a meaningful curriculum that includes the arts, music, physical education and career and technical programs. Provide effective strategies to schools to enable them to achieve the State targets through regional networks
Message from Johanna Duncan-Poitier, Senior Deputy Commissioner of Education- P-16
Date CapturedWednesday April 04 2007, 9:03 AM
It is an exciting time for education in New York State. For the first time in recent history, we have a solid P-16 action plan for statewide education reform and the resources necessary to fully support our schools and to help all students reach high standards of performance. The Board of Regents have set forth a P-16 agenda to improve graduation rates, strengthen instruction, raise learning standards, and increase accountability. At the same time, the new 2007-08 State budget includes an unprecedented increase of $1.7 billion in aid to school districts across the State. With the action plan and resources as the foundation for the future of education in this State, we are well-positioned to marshal the talent and energy across the Pre-Kindergarten through higher education continuum to achieve greater success for all students.
Length of School Day
Date CapturedSaturday March 24 2007, 3:00 PM
Length of School Day: The minimum length of school day for purposes of generating State Aid is 2.5 hours for half-day kindergarten, 5.0 hours for full-day kindergarten through grade 6 and 5.5 hours for grades 7-12. These hours are exclusive of the time allowed for lunch. If school district officials establish a school calendar in excess of 180 required days, the excess days need not comply with the mandated daily time requirements. (Commissioner's Regulations 175.5) Students of compulsory attendance age must be scheduled for attendance upon instruction for the entire time the school is in session. The term session refers to the period during which instruction is provided. However, such daily sessions may include supervised study periods, supervised cooperative work study, release time for college study or school-to-work programs, and as well as traditional classroom instructional activities. (Education Law 3210(1))
School Year, Extraordinary Condition Days, Examination Days, Superintendent's Conference Days, Length of School Day and Student Attendance
Date CapturedSaturday March 24 2007, 2:48 PM
Days of Session: School districts must be in session for all students, including students with disabilities, for not less than 180 days. Included in the 180 days are days on which attendance is taken, days on which Regents examinations, State Assessments or local examinations are given and days on which superintendent's conference days are held. School district officials may not claim partial or full attendance on days when classes are not in actual session. This situation is most likely to occur on Regents examination days or superintendent's conference days. Such days do count toward the 180 required days, but, since they are not days of actual session, they do not affect and are not factored into average daily attendance. (Education Law 3604(7)).
State comptroller will monitor Roosevelt spending
Date CapturedWednesday March 21 2007, 9:18 AM
Newsday John Hildebrand reports, "Starting in May, auditors from the comptroller's regional office in Hauppauge will bring an added layer of financial supervision to the already much-monitored school district. They will check expenses and revenues as they come in, rather than waiting until year's end as usual."
Commissioner Mills Announces Actions Regarding 31 Schools
Date CapturedFriday March 16 2007, 4:58 PM
State Education Commissioner Richard Mills today placed 20 Schools Under Registration; reached agreements with New York City, Rochester, and Albany to phase out and close seven schools; and warned that an additional four former SURR schools are at risk of being identified for registration review next year if performance does not improve. The Commissioner also announced the removal of eight schools from registration review. These actions bring the total number of Schools Under Registration Review (SURR schools) to 65 statewide, 35 of them in New York City.
From the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner
Date CapturedFriday March 16 2007, 4:55 PM
Use of Calculators: An updated field memorandum regarding the use of calculators in commencement level mathematics has been issued. The field memorandum is available at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/mst/mnews.html. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Schools Under Registration Review (SURR): On March 15, 2007 Commissioner Mills issued a press release placing 20 schools under registration review, removing eight schools from registration review, and phasing out and closing seven schools. The press release is available at http://www.oms.nysed.gov/press/surr031508.htm.
The Roosevelt schools budget crisis
Date CapturedThursday March 15 2007, 10:38 PM
Newsday Roosevelt web special
Roosevelt schools will remain under state review
Date CapturedThursday March 15 2007, 10:32 PM
Newsday John Hildebrand reports, "State education officials Thursday announced that they had rejected a request by Roosevelt school superintendent Ronald Ross to remove the district's high school from the "Schools Under Registration Review" list -- a designation reserved for the lowest-performing schools in the state. At the same time, the state added Wyandanch Memorial High School to the list, while removing Hempstead High School, where student achievement has improved in recent years."
New York State Education adds 20 schools to most troubled list
Date CapturedThursday March 15 2007, 6:09 PM
AP reports, "The number of schools in serious need of improvement and at risk of being closed is rising, state Education Commissioner Richard Mills said Thursday. His comment came as the state put 20 schools on its list of those in most serious in need of improvement, while removing eight. Mills added nine New York City schools, three each in Buffalo, Syracuse and Rochester, one in Wyandanch on Long Island and one in Yonkers. Mills removed six schools in New York City, one in Hempstead, and one in Yonkers. That's five more schools than were added in 2006, and five more schools removed than in 2006."
New York legislature chooses two new Regents
Date CapturedTuesday March 13 2007, 6:50 PM
AP reports, "Charles Bendit and Natalie Gomez-Velez joined the 16-member Board of Regents following a vote of the Legislature dominated by the Assembly's Democrats. Reappointed were Regents James Tallon and Milton Cofield."
State takes aim on Roosevelt's $12M deficit
Date CapturedTuesday March 13 2007, 6:15 PM
Newsday HERBERT LOWE reports, "The actions include mandating the use of $4.4 million worth of new revenue enhancements and spending reductions, according to a joint release from the state Board of Regents and state Education Department. Other measures: Directing the district's state-appointed fiscal monitor to ensure several specific financial controls; and assigning additional state appointees to help solve the situation. Roosevelt is the first district in New York to be taken over by the state."
Students' test rulers don't measure up
Date CapturedTuesday March 13 2007, 7:46 AM
Newsday JOHN HILDEBRAND reports on defective equipment purchased by New York State Education Department, "The problem: 1.1 million plastic protractors mailed out by the state last month with test packets are missing 1/16th of an inch from the four-inch ruler along the bottom of the angle-measuring tools. Moreover, 1.6 million plastic rulers also sent out by the state are irregularly marked, with quarter-inch hash marks that are shorter than three-quarter-inch marks. Those lines are equal on standard rulers."
Dial down the nasty, Regent urges angry New York City parents
Date CapturedFriday March 09 2007, 7:48 AM
NY Daily News Erin Einhorn reports, " State Board of Regents member called on city parent leaders yesterday to 'tone down' the rhetoric they're using to oppose the Education Department. Following weeks in which Mayor Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Joel Klein have met with rising fury from parents who feel they've not been consulted on sweeping changes planned for schools, Regent Merryl Tisch, a longtime Bloomberg ally, visited a citywide parents group to urge calm."
Bilingual school embraces both its languages
Date CapturedThursday March 08 2007, 10:44 AM
Post-Standard reports, "Seymour needs to prove itself with the state Education Department. In January 2006, the state put Seymour 'under registration review' because its scores were too low on the state fourth-grade English language arts test. The dual-language program should help those scores, and the state has agreed to the expansion of Seymour's program, Perkins said. The benefits of the dual-language program go beyond academics, Perkins said. 'We're seeing our students being able to integrate together, no separation of our racial or ethnic groups,' she said. Lowengard envisions the Seymour program to be a model."
Failure is not an option; State cannot throw in its fiscal towel and leave Roosevelt schools in lurch
Date CapturedThursday March 08 2007, 10:36 AM
Newsday opines, "There's plenty of blame to go around, but the buck stops with the State Education Department and Commissioner Richard Mills. The state stepped in to run the district because the local school board and officials were doing such a poor job, both in terms of educating children and in running the district efficiently. If the state can't run the district, then nobody can. And that is unacceptable."
Roosevelt schools facing $12M deficit
Date CapturedTuesday March 06 2007, 7:54 PM
Newsday JOHN HILDEBRAND reports, "The state's new comptroller, Thomas DiNapoli, declared that the 2,800-student district is headed toward a fiscal crisis. The state [education department] took direct control of the troubled school system in 2002 -- the first and only time Albany has done this -- and state-appointed administrators have run the district ever since. 'Continuing on this path, the district will run out of cash and won't be able to pay its bills,' DiNapoli declared. 'These problems must be addressed now. It is essential that a realistic, long-term financial plan is developed to get the district on the right track.'"
New York State Education Department NEWS & NOTES
Date CapturedFriday March 02 2007, 9:57 AM
From the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner March 1, 2007.
'SLIMY TEACHER' WOE WORSENS
Date CapturedSaturday February 24 2007, 9:09 AM
NY Post David Andreatta reports, "The number of teachers in New York facing "moral character" inquiries for having had sex with students or brushes with the law has nearly doubled in the last five years, according to the state Education Department." (READ REPORT on Education New York online at http://www.educationnewyork.com/SearchPublic.aspx?btnSubmit=Go&txtSearch=NYS+Education+Department/)
Report to the Professional Standards and Practices Board by the Office of Teaching Initiatives
Date CapturedFriday February 23 2007, 7:38 PM
New York State Education Department -- A five year analysis (2001-2002 through 2005-2006) of Moral Character Cases.
From the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner
Date CapturedFriday February 23 2007, 11:41 AM
New York State Education Department
Adding up teachers
Date CapturedWednesday January 10 2007, 6:24 AM
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle opines, "The state's teacher data give high marks to most local suburban districts and a lower grade to the City School District. Rochester officials said Tuesday the information is flawed and that the district has more "highly qualified'' teachers than they're getting credit for. For example, the numbers show 44 percent of the city's reading teachers are below the standard. The city says they're all highly qualified. Let's get the numbers right, but with the knowledge that, even when they are right, they don't tell the whole story. Only a good teacher-child-parent relationship can fill in the gaps."
New York Risks Losing Fed Bucks for Education
Date CapturedTuesday January 09 2007, 4:56 AM
NY Post David Andreatta reports, "More New York state public-school teachers than ever are "highly qualified" - but the state could lose millions in federal education aid unless all of its teachers meet the standard by July. State Education Commissioner Richard Mills acknowledged that the deadline, set by the No Child Left Behind law, would be tough to meet, in spite of significant progress over the last year."
From the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner
Date CapturedMonday January 08 2007, 9:07 AM
New York State Education Department (NYSED) Public Announcement of District/School Data: During the week of January 8, the Department will release to the media and the public a list of public schools and districts in improvement status for the 2006-07 school year and the percentage of core courses taught by teachers who were highly qualified in 2005-06 in each public school district and charter school. Providers of NCLB Supplemental Educational Services: The next application period to become a New York State-approved supplemental educational services provider begins January 19, 2007. On behalf of the Board of Regents, the Department notifies districts of location, public schools, and nonpublic schools in the same geographic area of any actions that the Board of Regents has taken related to charter schools as well as the receipt of any new proposed charter applications, proposed renewal applications, or proposed revisions. The notified districts of location, public schools, and nonpublic schools are encouraged to comment on the proposed action and solicit comments from the community through a public hearing on the proposed action. (Read more announcements here)
‘Good Start’ For Everyone
Date CapturedSunday January 07 2007, 7:38 AM
Post-Journal (Jamestown) reports, "The state Board of Regents and the state Education Department recently approved what it calls a ‘P-16 Plan’ to bring a coherent set of goals and standards for education from pre-kindergarten through the end of a students’ college years. According to the Board of Regents, the plan includes providing every child with a ‘good start,’ preparing pupils to be able to read by the second grade and graduating individuals ready to enter the ‘workforce, higher education and citizenship.'’’
NYSED Update on Limited English Proficient/English Language Learner (LEP/ELL
Date CapturedTuesday January 02 2007, 8:09 AM
New York state education Commissioner Mills has issued a field memorandum regarding the Regents and Department's efforts to advocate for change in the federal policy that requires all English language learners (ELLs) who have been in this country for more than one year to take their state's English language arts tests. Even as the Department works to change the U.S. Department of Education's policy, we must follow the law and implement the policy during this coming year. The field memorandum identifies a number of additional steps the Department has undertaken at various levels to help our ELL students.
Applications to Become a NYS-Approved Supplemental Educational Services Provider Will Soon be Accepted
Date CapturedTuesday December 26 2006, 1:46 PM
The next Application Period will begin January 19, 2007. After that date, applicants will be invited to submit an application and their response to a "Request for Qualifications" (RFQ) to be reviewed by NYSED. After these RFQs have been reviewed, approved applicants will be placed in NYSED's "Approved Supplemental Educational Services Provider" (ASESP) catalog. An optional Orientation Session for Provider Applicants will be held in Albany on January 19, 2007.
Not Enough Time for Phys Ed, Schools Plead
Date CapturedMonday December 18 2006, 4:54 AM
Post-Standard reports, "The education department's deputy commissioner also reminded all superintendents throughout the state of the physical education requirements and urged them to review their programs to ensure they are in compliance. The reminder was sent in the School Executive's Bulletin. The department sent the letters and reminders after reading an article in The Post-Standard last month that found only one of the school districts in Central New York in compliance with the physical education regulations. 'We learned of the allegation of noncompliance as a result of your reporting,' said Jonathan Burman, of the state Education Department."
From the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner
Date CapturedFriday December 15 2006, 8:46 AM
Physical Education Requirements: The Department has received allegations that certain school districts may not be providing physical education programs to students in full compliance with Section 135.4 of the Commissioner's Regulations. School districts are encouraged to review the regulations to ensure that they are in compliance with the number of days per week and total minutes per week that are required for physical education at each grade level.
University of the State of New York, P-16 Education: A Plan For Action
Date CapturedMonday December 11 2006, 1:53 PM
We will confront the data, share it broadly, and use it to define as precisely as possible where resources and energy should be applied. We will recognize the achievements and also declare the problems as clearly as we can. We will engage everyone by listening to the people the education system is supposed to serve, to parents, to educators at every level, to the employers, and to the elected officials who must weigh enormous competing demands for scarce resources. In particular, we will engage students and their parents, and the wider community because educational institutions do not belong to the educators but to the people. We will create a communications plan to listen to, inform, and involve people statewide. We will define measurable objectives so that others can hold us accountable, and we can hold education leaders accountable for improving results. We will study the practices of high performing education systems, states and nations, and adapt the best to New York’s situation. We will examine what actions are most effective, and invite others to learn with us. We will take action focused on systematic change to effect sustained improvement. We know, for example, that closing the achievement gap for students requires correcting the unequal distribution of teaching talent. And we know that in demanding change in educational institutions to achieve better results, we must also build capacity in our own State Education Department to take on its part of this improvement strategy. We will continually renew the alignment of our actions to ensure coherence and effectiveness. For example, academic standards, curriculum, assessment, and instructional practice have to be aligned to be effective. When one element changes, all other elements must be examined to ensure that the system remains effective. We will strengthen USNY, because it has great potential to build more effective transitions for students from one level of the system to the next. We will advocate for State and federal financial resources and legislative actions that will help achieve better educational outcomes. And we will be accountable for the effective use of those resources.
Amendments to Commissioner's Regulations 120.4 regarding Supplemental Educational Services (SES)
Date CapturedTuesday December 05 2006, 9:56 AM
The New York State Education Department invites you to comment on proposed amendments to Commissioner’s Regulations 120.4 regarding Supplemental Educational Services which have been filed with the Department of State for publication in the State Register on December 6, 2006. The amendments, in their entirety, are available for your review here.
Roosevelt scrutiny intensifies
Date CapturedTuesday December 05 2006, 5:45 AM
Newsday John Hildebrand writes, "In addition to outdated textbooks, state officials report that some students at Roosevelt High weren't assigned to the correct classes or lacked proper class schedules as recently as the fourth week of October. Those officials add that the problem seemed to stem from glitches in a new computer system, and that it was corrected after parents alerted them to it. Academics and finances also continue to pose problems. The district continues to show a budget deficit for the 2005-06 school year, though state monitors recently lowered estimates of the amount from $4.3 million to $3.4 million. The district's total budget this year is $61 million. And while Roosevelt's test scores are strong on the elementary level, they lag in the middle grades."
Trolling for students with prizes as the lure
Date CapturedTuesday December 05 2006, 5:34 AM
Times Union reports, "Inducements are increasingly common in the emerging tutoring industry, in which companies compete for kids and the public dollars behind them. Now, New York state officials want to know what rewards are being offered, and they want to be able to approve or deny them."
Regents poised to adopt strict rules on for-profit schools
Date CapturedTuesday December 05 2006, 4:48 AM
AP reports, "The Regents plan will require a transition period before the schools are granted final authority to award degrees. The state will make sure the programs are rigorous enough. Remedial classes will be clearly differentiated from credit-bearing courses and stronger admissions policies will make sure students have accurate information about each school, the job market and their job placement programs, according to Johanna Duncan-Poitier of the state Education Department."
New York State Education Department
Date CapturedMonday December 04 2006, 2:23 PM
From the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner December 1, 2006.
THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / THE UNIVERSITY OF THE NEW YORK
Date CapturedMonday December 04 2006, 2:18 PM
Robert G. Bentley, Executive Director of Professional Licensing and Teacher Certification, in a memo writes, "I am writing to let you know of a vacancy on the New York State Professional Standards and Practices Board for Teaching in the following category: School Administrator: A building-level or district-level school leader in a New York State school."
Schools do the math
Date CapturedFriday December 01 2006, 3:55 PM
Newsday JOHN HILDEBRAND reports, "In response to complaints, the State Education Department today is informing local school officials that they, and not students or parents, are responsible for purchasing hand-held calculators whenever those devices are required in classrooms. The ruling potentially affects more than 100,000 students on Long Island alone, officials said. The state's rationale: Calculators are considered teaching materials, like textbooks. In this sense, the state regards the devices as different from 'supplies,' such as pencils and paper, that are relatively inexpensive and that students can be required to buy."
New York State Education Department (NYSED) Application Portal
Date CapturedMonday November 27 2006, 9:33 AM
State to monitor school districts
Date CapturedSunday November 26 2006, 9:33 AM
The Post-Standard reports, "This year, the department developed a 'physical education profile' for schools to use to assess student achievement in meeting the state's physical education standards, Dunn said. The profile intends to provide an outline to use in teaching physical education."
After 4 Years of Roosevelt School Takeover, Debate on Its Effect Still Rages
Date CapturedSaturday November 18 2006, 6:49 AM
NY Times reports, "The state’s [New York] ultimate success or failure in turning around the district will have implications far beyond this small suburb on Long Island, since troubled districts throughout New York State and beyond face the prospect of takeovers prescribed by the federal No Child Left Behind Act."
Use of Technology in Education
Date CapturedFriday November 17 2006, 5:46 PM
The Board of Regents created a statewide Technology Policy and Practices Council to study the use of technology in education. As part of this effort, the Metiri Group will be conducting random surveys of school districts and other members of the University of the State of New York. Commissioner Mills urges all selected to participate in the survey process; a letter from him with additional information is available at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/metirisurvey.htm.
New York State Assembly looks to improve education
Date CapturedFriday November 17 2006, 6:59 AM
Capital News 9 reports, "Mills [Commissioner] said the most recent data shows achievement in public schools is improving, but there's still work to be done, especially because one third of students don't graduate high school on time. He also said learning at the middle school level is lagging, which indicates why half of 8th graders don't meet reading and writing standards."
NYSED REVISED PROPOSED REGULATIONS FOR PUBLIC COMMENT THROUGH DECEMBER 15, 2006
Date CapturedThursday November 16 2006, 5:31 PM
Revised proposed regulations relating to Behavioral Interventions, including Aversive Interventions have been published in the State Register and are available for public comment. A two-page summary of the major revisions to the regulations that were adopted through emergency action in June 2006 is available to assist the public in its review of the revised proposed rules. A full text of the revised proposed rule can be accessed at http://www.vesid.nysed.gov/specialed/behavioral/proposedterms1106.htm
Hyde Park school district vows state will pay
Date CapturedThursday November 16 2006, 6:55 AM
Poughkeepsie Journal reports, "Hyde Park schools have qualified for $1,479,243 in state funding for building improvements through the Expanding our Children's Education and Learning program. These funds can also be used to secure another $1.79 million in state aid. This will provide the district with $3,265,000 for its various building upgrades and repairs. The district, however, must receive voter approval to receive any of the funds because the money is initially borrowed by the district and later reimbursed by the state. The district plans to borrow the money over a 16-year period. Board members say the state takes into account the interest costs for borrowing."
Provision of Special Education Services to Parentally Placed Nonpublic Elementary and Secondary School Students with Disabilities
Date CapturedFriday November 10 2006, 8:28 AM
Provision of Special Education Services for the 2007-08 school year: The public school district where the nonpublic school is located must begin to develop procedures for the evaluation and provision of special education services to students with disabilities enrolled in nonpublic schools located in their district for the 2007-08 school year in accordance with the new federal regulations. In this process, the school district must consult with nonpublic school representatives and representatives of parents of parentally placed private school students with disabilities for nonpublic schools located within the boundaries of the school district. Additional guidance will be issued upon further changes to State law.
2006 Essential Elements: Schools-To-Watch
Date CapturedFriday November 10 2006, 8:23 AM
Models of Academic Excellence, Social Equity, Developmental Responsiveness, Organization and Structure. For more information about NY State's Schools to Watch program please visit the New York State Middle School Association Website at http://www.nysmsa.org/.
Reminder of Annual AHERA Notifications to Employees and Parents
Date CapturedFriday November 10 2006, 8:16 AM
Public and nonpublic schools must also provide a written notification to all parent, teacher, and employee organizations of the availability of the school’s asbestos management plan for public inspection. A description of the steps to notify these organizations, as well as a dated copy of the notification, is to be maintained in the asbestos plan. The asbestos management plans are to be made available for inspection to representatives of the federal Environmental Protection Agency and the State, the public, including parents, teachers, and other school personnel within five working days after receiving a request for its inspection.
From the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner, New York State Education Department
Date CapturedFriday November 10 2006, 8:08 AM
ELA and Mathematics Results on the New York State Testing and Accountability Reporting Tool (nySTART): Beginning November 14, authorized users in schools and districts will be able to access parent reports for the grades 3-8 State assessments in mathematics using nySTART. Beginning November 13, files containing the mathematics parent reports will be distributed to Regional Information Centers and the Big 5 school districts. If your district has contracted with a Regional Information Center or BOCES to print the reports, please contact them for information about the printing and distribution schedule. Information about interpreting student scores, particularly the standard performance indices, is available at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/nystart/2006/InterpretingStudentScores_files/frame.htm. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Accountability Verification: On November 14, school districts and charter schools will have access to two sets of reports allowing them to verify student data that will be used to determine each district’s and school’s accountability status at the elementary and middle levels for the 2006-07 school year. Each school superintendent, school principal, and staff member with account administrator privileges can access these reports through nySTART, using their personal UserIDs and passwords. The deadline for submitting data changes to your district’s Regional Information Center or Level 1 Repository operator is November 20. More information about the verification process is available at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/irts/nystart/. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Essential Elements Schools to Watch: New York State is one of 14 states that has joined Schools to Watch, a national recognition program developed by the National Forum to Accelerate Middle Grades Reform. In New York, seven schools were selected for the 2006 group of Schools to Watch by distinguishing themselves in academic excellence, developmental responsiveness, social equity and organization and structure. A list of the schools is available at http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/mle/news/schools2watch.htm. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Reminder of Annual AHERA Notifications to Employees and Parents: The federal Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) requires all schools to provide public notification regarding inspections and other activities related to asbestos. Schools must also make its asbestos management plan available for public inspection. For more information, go to http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/facplan/AHERA/aheranotifyreminder.htm. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- VESID Update: National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard (NIMAS) and National Instructional Materials Access Center (NIMAC): Guidance regarding NIMAS and NIMAC, as required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, is now available at http://www.vesid.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/persprep/nimas.htm. NIMAC is designed to streamline access to instructional materials that meet the NIMAS standard for students who are blind or have other print disabilities. Please review and share as appropriate; a response is needed no later than November 30, 2006. Provision of Special Education Services to Parentally Placed Nonpublic Elementary and Secondary School Students with Disabilities: This memorandum, available at http://www.vesid.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/policy/ nonpublic.htm, informs school districts of their responsibilities to provide special education services to parentally placed nonpublic school students with disabilities for the 2006-07 school year. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Previous News and Notes: 10/27/06 10/20/06 10/6/06 11/09/2006
Feds say New York misdirected $118 million in reading grants
Date CapturedSaturday November 04 2006, 8:05 AM
AP Michael Gormley reports, "The state Education Department was wrong to direct $118 million in federal grants to New York's neediest schools because the money for reading programs was supposed to be broadly applied, according a federal audit issued Friday. The state Education Department 'inappropriately awarded approximately $118 million in Reading First subgrants, of which the nine (school districts) had drawn down approximately $70 million,' according to the audit by the federal Inspector General's Office. Those nine school districts received money intended for other school districts, according to the audit."
New York State Education Department PARENT and FAMILY PARTNERSHIPS
Date CapturedTuesday October 31 2006, 5:12 PM
NYSED: Please share your perspective on these Key Questions. Thank you for your thoughtful contribution to informing the Board of Regents and the State Education Department and to improving family partnerships throughout the state of New York.
Regents Propose State Aid Hike
Date CapturedSunday October 29 2006, 5:55 AM
Post-Journal reports, "Historically, four aids in particular have experienced significant increases as schools report their expenditures: building, transportation, public excess cost for special education and BOCES aids. As a result, the Regents eventual recommendation may vary by as much as $200 million. An update will be available in December. 'Student achievement has been improving, but we have far to go,’' said Robert M. Bennett, regents chancellor. 'To accelerate this progress, we must invest the funds our neediest children deserve so they can all get a good education. The Regents are urging full access to pre-kindergarten for all 4-year-olds. Our total state aid proposal offers a fair and sustainable solution to one of New York’s most critical issues.'’’
NYSUT calls for federal relief for new English learners
Date CapturedSaturday October 28 2006, 8:07 AM
New York Teacher reports, "The union [NYSUT] believes the new testing would be a violation of the 1974 landmark civil rights Supreme Court decision Lau v. Nichols. 'It is our opinion that using the same ELA tests designed for, validated and normed on English-proficient students to measure the ELA performance of their ELL peers is to blatantly deny them the civil rights protected under this decision,' Neira [NYSUT Vice President and UFT representative] said. 'It is our opinion that in the United States using the same test is not equal treatment for our ELL students.'"
BOARD OF REGENTS PROPOSES MAJOR REFORM IN STATE AID TO NEW YORK STATE SCHOOLS
Date CapturedTuesday October 24 2006, 5:47 PM
The Board of Regents today recommended a $1.48 billion increase in State Aid to schools for 2007-2008. Most of this funding would go to school districts educating the State’s neediest children. The Regents propose an increase in State Aid to schools that is designed to link funding to the cost of a successful education. Like last year’s proposal, the proposal this year features a simple Foundation Formula that would replace 31 separate aid categories: District's State Aid = [Foundation Cost X Pupil Need X Regional Cost Index] – Expected Local Share
Museum of Natural History Soon to Grant Degrees, Too
Date CapturedTuesday October 24 2006, 3:13 AM
NY Times reports, "The American Museum of Natural History, which plays host to about 400,000 schoolchildren each year, is about to become a graduate school. The New York State Board of Regents yesterday authorized the museum, on the West Side of Manhattan, to grant master’s degrees and Ph.D.’s in comparative biology, making it the first American museum with its own doctoral degree."
Buffalo schools running short of snow days
Date CapturedTuesday October 17 2006, 8:27 PM
Buffalo News reports, "Under state law, districts must have at least 180 days of instruction in order to receive their full share of state aid. Four of those days can be superintendent conference days. Sources said local districts probably will ask State Education Commissioner Richard P. Mills to lower that requirement to 175 days due to last week's crippling storm."
New York State comptroller’s audit alleges school district wasted $12 million in taxpayer money
Date CapturedTuesday October 17 2006, 8:19 PM
Mid-Hudson News reports, "The audit charged the district wasted $12.5 million in taxpayer money because the district did not property address building occupancy levels and declining enrollment, which led to the closure of the Delaware Valley and Narrowsburg school buildings. The audit also said the district did not realize $2.1 million in savings due to economies of scale in staffing levels because it did not have a comprehensive strategic plan in place."
Grade 3-8 Math Tests For First Time Show Year-by-Year Trends in New York Schools Performance
Date CapturedThursday October 12 2006, 12:18 AM
New York State Education Department Press Release: For the first time, students this year took State tests in Grade 3-8 math. Those results, released today, showed a steady and relatively higher level of achievement in the elementary grades and lower achievement starting in Grade 5 and continuing through Grade 8. They also showed that student achievement overall in Grade 3-8 ranged from about 35 percent meeting all the standards in the Big 4 Cities to about 74 percent in Average Need Districts to 86 percent in Low Need Districts.
Five Buffalo area districts draw warnings on special ed
Date CapturedFriday October 06 2006, 10:28 AM
Buffalo News reports, "Lake Shore also has begun hand-delivering invitations to high school students to attend the annual special education committee meeting that evaluates their situation. That likely will help students in their transition out of high school, because they will be involved in the process leading up to it, Capell [director of special education] said."
Five Buffalo area districts draw warnings on special ed
Date CapturedFriday October 06 2006, 10:28 AM
Buffalo News reports, "Lake Shore also has begun hand-delivering invitations to high school students to attend the annual special education committee meeting that evaluates their situation. That likely will help students in their transition out of high school, because they will be involved in the process leading up to it, Capell [director of special education] said."
Not good enough for special needs kids
Date CapturedFriday October 06 2006, 6:46 AM
The Journal News reports, on East Ramapo's designation, "East Ramapo has long been identified as a struggling school district with student scores among the lowest in Rockland. It is Rockland's only district considered an urban/suburban school district because of its high percentage of children eligible to receive free- or reduced-price lunch and with limited English proficiency, both hallmarks of poverty. The newly released list contains a large proportion of schools with poor scores for all students and many large urban districts that long have struggled with poverty-related problems."
Report: Special education lags in 4 districts
Date CapturedFriday October 06 2006, 6:29 AM
The Poughkeepsie Journal reports, "Students with disabilities aren't doing as well as they should be in four Dutchess County school districts, so state education officials said they'll be stepping in to help." Poughkeepsie students with disabilities had the second lowest reported graduation rate in the state.
Spota backs Sen. LaValle on schools czar
Date CapturedFriday October 06 2006, 5:09 AM
Newsday reports, "LaValle said he was especially aggrieved that his bill is opposed by the state School Boards Association. 'The very people we want oversight over are the ones blocking the legislation,' he said."
75 New York School Districts Identified for Low Performance Among Students with Disabilities
Date CapturedThursday October 05 2006, 5:46 PM
New York State Education Department Press Release: The State Education Department has identified 75 school districts as “In Need of Assistance or Intervention” because of low performance among students with disabilities, Commissioner Richard Mills announced today.
October 18, 2006 is School Bus Driver Appreciation Day in New York State
Date CapturedSaturday September 30 2006, 2:38 AM
New York State Education Department Press Release: "WHEREAS, The position of a school bus driver requires tremendous responsibility; they have to maneuver through traffic regardless of road conditions while maintaining the conduct of the children on the bus and are looked upon for leadership and life-saving decision-making in the event of an emergency; and WHEREAS, School bus drivers delicately direct these children while they are exiting the bus at their destination; when an adult is normally at a bus stop to meet a child and is not present, they will keep that child in their safe care until adult supervision is located or the child can be returned to school; and WHEREAS, Furthermore, school bus drivers may also be an important aid in the fight against terrorism; they are able to observe any suspicious activity or people along their bus route and communicate that information to the proper authorities;"
September 28, 2006 Press Release - Closure of Taylor Business Institute
Date CapturedFriday September 29 2006, 12:01 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, SEPTEMBER 28, 2006: “We identified several areas of consistent non-compliance at Taylor. These areas include inadequate rigor, level and content of coursework that could impact a student’s ability to transfer credits to other degree-granting institutions; inadequate investments in critical educational services, such as faculty, library resources, equipment and support services; rapid turnover of staff and faculty; understaffed student support services; and hiring of staff and faculty who lack requisite skills and experience. In short, the students at Taylor are not receiving the college-level education that they are paying for,” said Johanna Duncan-Poitier, Deputy Commissioner for Higher Education and the Professions. "The State Education Department will directly contact all Taylor students to inform them about the school’s closure and detail all options for continuing their education at other institutions. The Department has arranged a College Transfer Fair for the Taylor students on October 18th from 2-7 p.m. at the CUNY Graduate Center. Representatives of other educational institutions will be there to discuss transfer opportunities. Information and guidance about State and Federal student financial aid will also be provided. “We want the transition to go smoothly so that students will choose to continue their education and graduate,” said Duncan-Poitier. "The Department has also created a page on its Web site for Taylor students."
State orders commercial school in NYC closed, citing poor quality
Date CapturedThursday September 28 2006, 4:08 AM
Newsday reports, "Their [group of educators] report stated that 'the institute operates more as a high school equivalency preparation enterprise than as a college.' The report also questioned whether the public investment in the school is worth it."
Now read this
Date CapturedMonday September 25 2006, 5:56 AM
Journal News opined on New York State Education Department results of English Language Arts test, "State Education Commissioner Richard Mills worried Thursday about the slacking off in literacy instruction. It apparently begins in fifth grade — not the abrupt nosedive New Yorkers had come to expect in eighth. Said Mills: 'Adult literacy scores are too low, but this is where it begins.' So must the response, starting with unplugging students from electronics, and plugging them into reading books, writing clearly and speaking their minds, coherently."
Taking a look at longer classes
Date CapturedMonday September 25 2006, 5:19 AM
Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin "A main roadblock to extending the year is financial concerns. Any move to add days to the school year, or hours to the school day, would have to be negotiated with labor unions, including teachers' associations, officials said. And this would mean higher labor costs. 'If you extend the school year, I would assume people would expect addition compensation,' Busch said."
Late for schools: It took state four years after takeover to appoint monitor for Roosevelt district, now $4M in the red
Date CapturedMonday September 25 2006, 4:38 AM
Newsday JOHN HILDEBRAND writes, "A review of Roosevelt's records reveals numerous early warning signs. During the summer, for example, the district laid off teachers and cut services including full-day kindergarten, after local voters twice rejected its budget. The second 'no' vote followed a state audit's revelation of irregular spending, sloppy bookkeeping and loose financial controls. At the time, the district's business office was in turmoil. It had undergone three changes of leadership in four months."
News and Notes
Date CapturedFriday September 22 2006, 11:22 PM
From the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner, New York State Education Department.
New York Reading Skills Drop After 5th Grade
Date CapturedThursday September 21 2006, 3:30 PM
NY Times DAVID M. HERSZENHORN reports, "The pattern of success in elementary school but failure in the middle grades, while hardly new, offered the most pessimistic assessment yet of New York State’s chances of meeting the goal of the No Child Left Behind law, which seeks 100 percent proficiency in reading and math among all categories of students by the 2013-14 school year, or even of a more realistic target of 80 percent proficiency for students without special needs."
New York State Department of Education: Grade 3-8 Tests For First Time Show
Date CapturedThursday September 21 2006, 2:57 PM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, September 21, 2006: For the first time, students this year took State tests in Grade 3-8. Those results, released today, showed a steady and relatively higher level of achievement in the elementary grades and lower achievement starting in Grade 6 and continuing through Grade 8. They also showed that student achievement overall in Grade 3-8 ranged from about 50 percent meeting all the standards in Urban High Need Districts to about 69 percent in Average Need Districts to 83 percent in Low Need Districts. There are substantial differences in performance among the Big 5 Cities. New York City was highest in Grade 3, with 62 percent meeting al the standards, and at Grade 8, with 37 percent meeting all the standards. Yonkers was not far behind in those grades. New York City and Yonkers both had about 51 percent of all students throughout Grade 3-8 meeting all the standards.
Results show English scores dropping as New York children get older
Date CapturedThursday September 21 2006, 1:36 PM
Newsday JOHN HILDEBRAND AND STACEY ALTHERR report, "State education officials declared at a morning news conference the latest results underline an essential point: that public middle schools need to do more to challenge students academically. Research studies have shown that scores in parochial and private schools don't take the same dip in the later grades as the public sector's."
The schoolyard bully
Date CapturedTuesday September 19 2006, 12:16 PM
Dick Iannuzzi, President, New York State United Teachers writes, "President Bush and his supporters in Congress have used NCLB as a weapon to punish schools instead of as a tool to improve them. Now they've turned that weapon on children with disabilities and children trying to learn English and adapt to a new culture." Iannuzzi additionally criticizes New York State Education Department (SED).
New York State Education Department News and Notes
Date CapturedFriday September 15 2006, 8:50 AM
Education news from the Desk of Jean C. Stevens, Interim Deputy Commissioner.
228 New York High Schools Are Identified As Needing Improvement
Date CapturedWednesday September 13 2006, 9:25 PM
A total of 228 high schools have been identified by the State Education Department as needing improvement under federal and state rules. Of these, 18 high schools were newly identified this school year. In addition, 29 schools have been removed from the list because they have made Adequate Yearly Progress for two consecutive years in all areas for which they were identified. An additional 75 high schools made AYP last year and will be removed from the list if they make AYP in 2006-2007.
New York State Education Department Dropout Prevention Resources
Date CapturedWednesday September 13 2006, 11:50 AM
Educators say they like new way of reporting test results
Date CapturedMonday September 11 2006, 6:59 AM
The Daily Star reports, "One of the features in the system is a unique 10-digit number being assigned to every child in pre-K through grade 12, according to the release. Previously, test results did not always accurately account for students who might have moved from a district, Gilbertsville-Mount Upton Superintendent Douglas Exley said. But under the new system, the identification numbers will move with the students. This feature is expected to produce better."
Fordham Graduate School of Education Nets $4.5 Million in Grants
Date CapturedSunday September 10 2006, 10:47 AM
The New York State Education Department has awarded Fordham University’s Graduate School of Education $4.5 million in contracts for two Bilingual Education Technical Assistance Centers (BETACs) to serve more than 51,300 students in grades K-12 in the Bronx and Lower Hudson Valley. The highly competitive awards each total $2.25 million over a five-year period. BETACs were established by the New York State Education Department to assist districts and schools in developing high quality educational programs to help English Language Learners (ELL) or Limited English Proficiency (LEP) students meet New York state’s learning standards.
New York Education Department unveils new student database
Date CapturedFriday September 08 2006, 6:58 AM
Times Record reports, "Teachers are all for the new system if it is used to help students learn, said Ron Simon, president of the New Paltz Teachers union. But he has concerns. 'Are we using it to hold students accountable for their learning, or are we using it to pinpoint teachers?' Simon asked. 'We would hate to see this one day being used to promote things like merit pay'."
New York schools test scores made easy for parents
Date CapturedFriday September 08 2006, 5:22 AM
Times Union Rick Karlin wites, "'These reports are designed to be parent-friendly,' Martha Musser, coordinator of information and reporting systems for the Education Department, said Thursday as the agency unveiled the new reports. They also will allow parents to track how their children are doing on standardized tests over time, said Acting Deputy Commissioner Jean Stevens."
NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT UNVEILS NEW SYSTEM TO TRACK AND REPORT STUDENT DATA, SYSTEM WILL PROVIDE NEW TOOLS TO IMPROVE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
Date CapturedThursday September 07 2006, 6:10 PM
Beginning this fall, test results will be delivered directly to schools in an electronic format, giving authorized school administrators and teachers instant access to data regarding individual student performance, performance by groups of students (including breakdowns by race, ethnicity, disability status, gender, English proficiency, economic status, and migrant status), and overall performance by school and school district. This electronic system will give schools interactive reports on all this information. Parents will receive more detailed printed reports explaining their children’s performance on the tests. The reports will not only give the overall score but will also give a more detailed breakdown of a student’s performance on several indicators of achievement. All individual student information will be protected during every phase of data collection and reporting.
New York State School Boards Association (NYSSBA) on charter schools
Date CapturedThursday September 07 2006, 2:25 PM
Letter from NYSSBA executive director Timothy Kremer to New York State Board of Regents Chancellor Robert Bennett on charter schools accountability, "Article 56 off the Education Law compels the Board of Regents to review 'the educational effectiveness of the charter school approach and the effect of charter schools on public and nonpublic schools systems.' Regrettably, the State Education Department’s recently released annual report on the status of charter schools fails to illuminate whether this strategy is working."
Regents urged to stop shocks
Date CapturedWednesday September 06 2006, 5:55 AM
Times Union Rick Karlin reports, "In addition to shock treatment, the regulations would govern the use of noxious sprays, withholding food, physical restraints and isolation rooms as ways to control mentally ill or disturbed youngsters. Such practices are unregulated by the Education Department, but the agency spends millions of dollars a year to send children to special schools, many of which are out of state, that have used some of these techniques."
Bus driving more than sitting behind wheel: Special training, annual tests help keep kids safe
Date CapturedMonday September 04 2006, 10:43 AM
The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle reports, "Each year, a driver must undergo a physical examination and defensive driving performance review. Also, three bus safety drills must be conducted on each route. Every two years, a driver is required to do a behind-the-wheel road test and a written or oral test, both required by the DMV, and a physical performance test mandated by the state Education Department that involves dragging a 125-pound weight 30 feet. And there are optional advanced courses a driver may take, some of which could lead to a driver becoming a certified driver instructor, for example."
State Education Commissioner Richard Mills to settle flap over charter school funding
Date CapturedFriday September 01 2006, 10:54 AM
Buffalo News reports, "District officials agree they must pay the charter school about $2.4 million - more than $9,000 per pupil. But they also contend state law only requires them to cover 155 of those pupils with about $1.4 million during the 2006-07 school year because that's how many pupils charter school officials projected the new school would draw from the city's public schools in the charter plan they submitted to the state in 2005. The remaining $1 million would be paid in 2007-08."
Principals slammed by Klein won 'satisfactory' rankings, union sez
Date CapturedFriday September 01 2006, 8:00 AM
NY Daily News ERIN EINHORN reports, "Klein's letter was his latest effort to undermine and divide the principals' union as it enters its fourth school year without a contract. Some principals were angered by his tactics."
Late exam results test city parents' patience
Date CapturedThursday August 31 2006, 8:22 AM
NY Daily News ERIN EINHORN and CARRIE MELAGO report, "'When the data are finally released, schools will get the information electronically, which Dunn [state Education Department spokesman] argued would make it 'more useful to them in helping children.' Parents also will be given user-friendly reports that explain how their child fared, he said."
A tally to avoid?
Date CapturedSunday August 27 2006, 9:31 AM
The Journal News opined, "The violence-reporting process is more than five years old in New York, and wrought with problems — challenges complicated by the added federal performance requirements of No Child Left Behind, instituted three years ago. Still, New York remains only in a 'training' phase, with its Education Department continuing to clarify criteria and teach local administrators how properly to report violent incidents. Even the state Comptroller's Office is involved now, looking anew over shoulders because random audits of schools earlier this year found reporting compliance abysmal."
Shed light on exams: New York should be more parent-friendly in explaining tests
Date CapturedSunday August 27 2006, 8:02 AM
The Rochester Democrat and Chronicle opined, "A lot of this information is now available on the Education (New York) Department's Web site. But getting to it requires weeding through a lot of dense education-speak. The site, which should be regarded as a prime information source for literally millions of New Yorkers, lacks clarity and readability — two standards, by the way, of writing that the state purports to measure."
2007 VESID State Plan Virtual Public Meeting
Date CapturedFriday August 25 2006, 6:31 PM
As part of the Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan development, VESID is seeking public comment on achieving high quality employment outcomes. Discussion will focus on transition, postsecondary education, and individual plan for employment (IEP) development.
LOWBALLING SCHOOL VIOLENCE...
Date CapturedThursday August 24 2006, 7:16 AM
NY Post editorial opined on school violence, "Regardless of the actual number of dangerous schools - 14, 140, or otherwise - zero tolerance on violent behavior must be the policy."
Majority Of State's Most Dangerous Schools Are In New York City
Date CapturedTuesday August 22 2006, 4:35 PM
NY1 reports, "Eleven of them (persistently dangerous) are schools for special education students and city sources say those schools are usually exempt from list."
Rome Free Academy joins state's 'watch list' for potentially dangerous schools
Date CapturedTuesday August 22 2006, 4:24 PM
Observer-Dispatch CARA MATTHEWS reports, "Another 17 schools, including two in Rochester, have been added to the Education Department's list of 'persistently dangerous' institutions after recording a large number of serious incidents for two consecutive years, Commissioner Richard Mills announced."
Seventeen New York Schools Named As "Persistently Dangerous" Under NCLB,
Date CapturedTuesday August 22 2006, 3:57 PM
As required by NCLB: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, AUGUST 22, 2006. Persistently dangerous list includes NYC schools, Rochester, Buffalo charter school, and Berkshire Junior-Senior High School. New York State Education Department press release, "An additional 10 schools have been placed on a 'watch list.'" NYC, Buffalo, Rome, Wyandanch, Greenburg-Graham on "watch list."
Plattsburgh State requests teacher-education program extension
Date CapturedMonday August 21 2006, 8:30 AM
The Press Republican writes, "Under the Regents amended guidelines, after a college has been reviewed for accreditation and deficiencies have been found, it can apply for an extension by submitting an action plan to the state Education Department, which determines how much longer the school gets."
New York State’s Revised Plan to Enhance Teacher Quality
Date CapturedWednesday August 16 2006, 5:20 PM
THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, The New York State Education Department. Albany, 12234, July 2006.
The State Education Department and the State Health Department memo and information pamphlet to underscore the potential magnitude of a pandemic on the education community and emphasize the need for preparedness
Date CapturedTuesday August 15 2006, 7:21 PM
In a severe pandemic, all employers—including schools —will experience a dramatic reduction in their workforce, as one-in-four employees becomes ill and others remain home to care for sick family members. Many schools may close because of excessive student and staff absenteeism. Available evidence indicates that school closure (perhaps as long as 12 weeks in duration) early in a pandemic may significantly reduce influenza transmission. Health officials will notify school authorities when conditions warrant school closure. In certain instances, school facilities may be asked to function as Points of Dispensing (PODs) for essential medications. We strongly encourage you to work closely with your county/city health department and emergency management officials to increase your district’s pandemic preparedness in the upcoming school year. To assist you in your planning process, we have prepared a pandemic information packet specifically designed for the education community.
Highlights of the NCLB’s and IDEA’s Requirements for Teachers and Title I Paraprofessionals in New York State August 2006
Date CapturedTuesday August 15 2006, 6:37 PM
This Fact Sheet contains highlights of the New York State Education Department's (SED's) implementation of requirements related to teachers and paraprofessionals in the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) as reauthorized in December 2004. It is based on laws, regulations, guidance and technical assistance available at the time of its publication and is subject to change in response to additional information. For more detailed information about the NCLB's requirements in New York State, please refer to the series of field memos available online at http://www.highered.nysed.gov/nclbhome.htm
Green Cleaning in Schools
Date CapturedTuesday August 15 2006, 5:45 PM
Effective September 1, 2006, State Education Law and State Finance Law require school districts to reduce exposure of children and school staff to potentially harmful chemicals and substances used in the cleaning and maintenance of schools by utilizing guidelines to procure environmentally friendly cleaning products. The State Office of General Services, in consultation with other State agencies, has developed final guidelines as well as a list of approved green cleaning products.
Business group rips schools, says taxpayers don't get good return on investments
Date CapturedSunday August 13 2006, 10:17 AM
Star-Gazette, Jay Gallagher reports, "The state's test scores are improving but more needs to be done to shift money to poorer districts, said a spokesman [Dunn] for the state Education Department. '... Too few dollars still go to the students and the schools with the greatest need, and class sizes are bigger there. The Board of Regents is urging a major reform of the state aid system. This will help tremendously to close the achievement gap,' said spokesman Tom Dunn."
Graduation rates must be a focus
Date CapturedSaturday August 12 2006, 7:51 AM
Poughkeepsie Journal opined on graduation, "Statewide testing has shown where the achievement gap exists. While the drop-out rate is significant, especially in some minority communities, lowering expectations is not the answer. Far from a hindrance, these test results are giving the state the opportunity to fix the problems."
Some students with limited English skills face new hurdle: State-ordered exam stirs Binghamton concerns
Date CapturedWednesday August 09 2006, 8:18 AM
Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin reports, "Until now, students with less than three years of U.S. schooling were exempt from the state ELA test, which is used to gauge whether schools are making adequate yearly progress for their students under No Child Left Behind. Instead, they could take a different test, the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test. But the federal government ruled this procedure fails to comply with No Child Left Behind rules, Stevens [Deputy Education Commissioner ] said."
New York changing test requirements for immigrant kids
Date CapturedMonday August 07 2006, 7:25 AM
The Journal News reports, "Education Commissioner Richard Mills outlined the changes in a letter last week to Assistant Secretary Henry L. Johnson of the U.S. Department of Education. Immigrant students who have been enrolled in U.S. schools for at least a year, as of January 2007, will begin taking the standard English language arts test in grades three to eight."
Niagara County Community College launches high-tech upgrade
Date CapturedSunday August 06 2006, 4:28 PM
Buffalo News reports, "College technicians will be able to upgrade software in any of the school's 1,000 desktop computers, and discover a software problem on any one of them and fix it without leaving their laboratory. They also will be able to plug security holes in the school's Windows computer operating system to prevent hackers from accessing it."
LEP/ELL Student Statewide Assessment Policy/Title I Requirements
Date CapturedSaturday August 05 2006, 1:34 AM
New York State Education Department press release from Jean C. Stevens reads, "New York has been notified by the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE), based upon USDOE’s NCLB standards and assessment peer review process, that NYSESLAT can no longer be used for Title I accountability purposes, except as described below for students newly arrived in the United States. USDOE determined that New York’s use of NYSESLAT for ELA accountability was not consistent with the requirements of NCLB and directed New York to come into compliance with NCLB by the end of the 2006-07 school year. As a result, New York must administer its ELA assessment to LEP/ELL students who, as of January 3, 2007, have been enrolled in school in the United States (excluding Puerto Rico) for one year or more."
More Students in New York Will Take Regular English Test
Date CapturedSaturday August 05 2006, 12:58 AM
NY Times DAVID M. HERSZENHORN reports, "Ordered by the federal government to improve its testing of students who speak limited English, New York State said yesterday that all children enrolled in school in the United States for at least a year would be required to take the state’s regular English Language Arts exam. The test is given annually in the third through eighth grades.
Yonkers schools meet federal standard for teacher quality
Date CapturedThursday August 03 2006, 6:48 AM
The Journal News reports, "The state Education Department has removed Yonkers from a list of schools that missed a federal standard for highly qualified teachers."
23 local schools miss federal standard for teacher quality
Date CapturedFriday July 28 2006, 7:38 AM
The Journal News reports, "The schools — from urban districts such as Yonkers and Mount Vernon to the suburban communities of Pleasantville and Clarkstown — had less than 90 percent of their core classes taught by highly qualified teachers, or faculty who are experts in their subject areas, in 2004-05, the latest year for which data is available. The No Child Left Behind law requires that all children be taught by highly qualified teachers — someone who holds at least a bachelor's degree, is certified by the state and demonstrates competence in the areas taught."
All teachers hit top at 5 Mid-Hudson school districts
Date CapturedFriday July 28 2006, 7:26 AM
Times-Herald reports, "Only five of 35 districts in Sullivan, Ulster and Orange counties had all teachers designated as highly qualified. The districts that hit the mark are Minisink Valley, Warwick, Greenwood Lake, Marlboro and Ellenville. With one exception, the rest of the school districts have 90 percent or more of their teachers at the highly qualified level. The other district is Tri-Valley, which had 89 percent of its teachers make the grade."
NYS Education Dept. Office of Professions & Teacher Certification accepting applications for immediate vacancies on the New York State Professional Standards and Practices Board for Teaching
Date CapturedWednesday July 26 2006, 3:42 PM
NYS Education Department: Apply for appointment to the Board if you have an interest in helping to shape teaching policy in New York State and if you qualify for appointment in one of the following categories: Higher Education (President or chief academic officer of a NYS college or university that prepares teachers), Teacher (Either a classroom teacher or pupil personnel service professional in a New York State school) Public (Representative of business, parent group, community organization, etc.) Teacher Education Student (Student matriculated in a teacher preparation program at a NYS institution, full-or part-time). Application information here.
2 schools secure high marks from education commissioner
Date CapturedTuesday July 25 2006, 9:18 AM
Buffalo News reports, "There may be nothing better school principals can experience than the state education commissioner telling them how great their students and staff are doing. Lockport High School Principal Frank Movalli and Emmet Belknap Middle School Principal Gary Wilson are no exception."
Group trying to open school
Date CapturedSunday July 23 2006, 9:53 AM
The Post-Standard reports, "'It's a huge undertaking to grow a nonpublic school,' said Tom Hogan, of the state Education Department. 'You can have a lot of very dedicated, well-intentioned people, but many of these attempts don't make it.'"
2004-05 Annual Report on the Status of Charter Schools in New York State
Date CapturedFriday July 21 2006, 10:49 AM
"This report provides data required by §2857(3) of the Education Law and covers the 2004-05 school year, during which a total of 61 charter schools were open for instruction. Of these 61 schools, 16 were chartered by the Board of Regents, 32 were chartered by the Board of Trustees of the State University of New York ('SUNY'), 11 were chartered by the Chancellor of the New York City Public Schools, and two were chartered by the Board of Education of the Buffalo City School District. Twenty-one had management companies as partners."
Academic Competitiveness Grants in New York State
Date CapturedThursday July 13 2006, 3:18 PM
The U.S. Department of Education (USED) has released information on the Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) Program as included in the Higher Education Reconciliation Act of 2005 (HERA). These grants are available to certain Pell-eligible college students starting with the 2006-07 academic year.
Action taken by the Board of Regents
Date CapturedWednesday July 12 2006, 8:46 AM
The Board of Regents must provide appropriate notification of the chartering process at significant stages to the school district in which the charter school is located and to all public and nonpublic schools in the same geographic area.
Finish the Test
Date CapturedWednesday July 12 2006, 7:47 AM
Post-Standard on Campaign for Fiscal Equity (CFE) lawsuit, "The CFE filed a brief last month asking the court to force the state to obey the ruling or face sanctions. The state responded this week with a counterbrief arguing, among other things, that the court has no business telling the state how to fund education. The ball is back in the Court of Appeals."
Standard tests set for special ed kids
Date CapturedTuesday July 11 2006, 7:16 AM
NY Daily News reports, "The U.S. Education Department rejected New York's longstanding practice of giving below-grade-level tests to some special ed students - triggering changes that could lead to lower test scores at some schools."
REGENTS RACKET
Date CapturedMonday July 10 2006, 7:07 AM
NY Post registration required. NY Post editorial writes, "New York state school officials had a problem: Not enough kids were meeting the standard to graduate with a Regents diploma. So what'd they do? They lowered the standard, of course."
Newburgh school plan stalled instate office
Date CapturedThursday July 06 2006, 7:53 AM
Times Herald-Record reports, "The goal was to create smaller, more manageable learning environments. The timetable seemed feasible - until the satellite building plans landed in the state Education Department's facilities planning division."
AUGUST 2006 REGENTS EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
Date CapturedWednesday July 05 2006, 8:50 AM
The University of the State of New York
BELOW-GRADE ED. DEPT.
Date CapturedSunday July 02 2006, 7:09 AM
NY Post registration required
Schools will end black and white policy on race
Date CapturedMonday June 26 2006, 11:31 AM
Staten Island Advance
Reading First Grant Awards
Date CapturedTuesday June 20 2006, 4:16 PM
New York State Department of Education
Regents to limit aversive therapy
Date CapturedTuesday June 20 2006, 7:47 AM
Disruptive elephant in the room
Date CapturedSunday June 18 2006, 8:37 AM
Kids hurt in shock therapy school
Date CapturedWednesday June 14 2006, 7:41 PM
Defining violence
Date CapturedWednesday June 14 2006, 8:33 AM
SCHOOL VIOLENT AND DISRUPTIVE INCIDENT DATA MADE AVAILABLE
Date CapturedMonday June 12 2006, 11:33 AM
50% more NYC schools win state kudos
Date CapturedWednesday June 07 2006, 7:20 AM
Higher Performing Schools and Districts
Date CapturedTuesday June 06 2006, 3:55 PM
Commissioner Mills Report to the Regents - May 2006
Date CapturedFriday May 26 2006, 10:36 PM
Monitoring Profit-Making Colleges (NY Times registration)
Date CapturedThursday May 25 2006, 6:57 AM
Regents need rigorous requirements
Date CapturedTuesday May 23 2006, 7:07 AM
Education reform is on right path in state
Date CapturedTuesday May 23 2006, 7:04 AM
State will monitor school safety data
Date CapturedTuesday May 23 2006, 6:09 AM
SCHOOL SAFETY
Date CapturedMonday May 22 2006, 3:42 PM
To address issues of school safety and violence prevention, the Safe Schools Against Violence in Education Act (SAVE) was passed by the New York State Legislature and signed into law by Governor George E. Pataki on July 24, 2000. Project SAVE culminates the work of the Task Force on School Violence chaired by Lieutenant Governor Mary Donohue. The New York State Board of Regents approved Regulations of the Commissioner of Education to ensure compliance with the new legislation. This site provides resources to assist schools in the development and maintenance of safe school environments.
Schools Faulted For Failing To Report Violence
Date CapturedMonday May 22 2006, 3:38 PM
GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED IN REPORTING VIOLENT AND DISRUPTIVE INCIDENTS
Date CapturedMonday May 22 2006, 8:46 AM
New York State Education Department school safety glossary of terms.
Regents ask state to probe race bias
Date CapturedTuesday May 16 2006, 7:38 AM
Testing boundaries
Date CapturedMonday May 15 2006, 7:08 AM
Manhattan: Battle Over Charter School (NY Times registration)
Date CapturedTuesday May 09 2006, 6:14 AM
The New York State School Report Card For School Year 2004-2005
Date CapturedWednesday May 03 2006, 4:10 PM
U.S. inquiry targets school for blind
Date CapturedTuesday May 02 2006, 6:45 AM
Getting Schooled
Date CapturedSunday April 30 2006, 8:03 AM
NEW YORK STATE UNIVERSAL PREKINDERGARTEN PROGRAM
Date CapturedFriday April 28 2006, 4:14 PM
Regents canvass several Syracuse schools
Date CapturedTuesday April 25 2006, 8:59 AM
NY State Education Commissioner Mills visits Syracuse schools
Date CapturedTuesday April 25 2006, 12:03 AM
Guidance on Locally Required Summer Reading Assignments
Date CapturedSaturday April 22 2006, 7:32 PM
2006 Statewide Summer Reading Program
Date CapturedMonday April 17 2006, 9:29 AM



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